The March of Time

China Daily. There was a time when the newsweeklies set the agenda for the nation’s conversation – when Time and Newsweek would digest the events of the week and US readers would wait by their mailboxes to see what was on the covers.

Those days have passed, and come the end of the year, the print edition of Newsweek will pass, too. Cause of death: The march of time.

“The tempo of the news and the Web have completely overtaken the news magazines,” said Stephen G. Smith, editor of the Washington Examiner and the holder of an unprecedented newsweekly triple crown – nation editor at Time, editor of US News and World Report, and executive editor of Newsweek from 1986 to 1991.

Where once readers were content to sit back and wait for tempered accounts of domestic and foreign events, they now can find much of what they need almost instantaneously on their smartphones and tablet computers. Where once advertisers had limited places to spend their dollars to reach national audiences, they now have seemingly unlimited alternatives.

So on Thursday, when Newsweek’s current owners announced they intended to halt print publication and expand the magazine’s Web presence, there was little surprise. But there was a good deal of nostalgia for what Smith called “the shared conversation that the nation used to have”, when the networks, the newsweeklies and a few national newspapers reigned.

Geek is New Hip

Cartoon via Webdesignerdepot.com

MarketWatch. With geeks and their lifestyles emerging as the new totems of coolness, marketers from a wide swath of companies are jumping on the trend for marketing opportunities, and there is perhaps no better target audience than the attendees at New York Comic Con.

The people drawn to New York Comic Con because of their fascination for Avengers, Spider-Man characters, and countless other creations “are people who are setting trends,” said Dan Buckley, president and publisher of print, digital and TV at Marvel, in an interview. “They are the early adopters of technology. These are the people who start things and make them hot.”

Getting the attention of trendsetters is crucial for these companies particularly in today’s digital world, where a tweet or a Facebook post can generate broad levels of interest. Companies are seeking to build loyalty with consumers who have myriad choices and have changed the way they purchase and spend their leisure time with smartphones and other mobile devices, analysts said.

Solomonic: Who owns the word ‘catholic’, ‘islam’, ‘bible’ online

Centuries-old theological disputes have broken out in cyberspace as religions aim to influence the future presentation of faith on the Internet.

The forum for the rivalry is not the pulpit or church bulletin, but the website of ICANN, the corporation that oversees the Internet address system and now wants to expand it beyond the usual .com, .org or .net domains.

When ICANN began accepting applications for new names early this year, bids came for extensions such as .catholic, .islam and .bible. Not far behind were critics who challenged many applicants’ right to monopolize those and other religious terms.

“I respectfully ask you not to award .bible to a bunch of hardcore Bible-thumpers,” wrote one critic of an application by the American Bible Society to manage that extension.

Questioning a Turkish IT company’s bid for the .islam domain, Fahd Batayneh of Jordan’s National Information Technology Centre asked how it could ensure no pornographers or Muslim extremists would use names with this ending?

ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, is accepting comments on these and other applications for another month and will then evaluate the bids for new extensions, known as top level domains (TLDs).

First results are due next summer. A group awarded a TLD can manage that domain exclusively, renting out addresses that use its extension and rejecting bids it considers unsuitable. Via Stuff NZ

“It’s absolutely the worst scenario for us”: Samsung

$1 billion judgment levied against Samsung for infringing on Apple’s patents reportedly has the South Korea company reeling. While Samsung executives weren’t optimistic about an overwhelming victory in a Silicon Valley courtroom last week, the one-sided decision loss apparently caught them by surprise.

It’s absolutely the worst scenario for us,” a senior Samsung executive told the Korea Times as he rushed into the company’s Seoul headquarters.

Since a jury in a San Jose, Calif., courtroom on Friday decided overwhelmingly in favor of Apple’s patent claims against Samsung, the Korea electronics giant has focused on the verdict’s effect on the smartphone market. The company called the awarding of $1.05 billion in damages to Apple “a loss for the American consumer” and promised that “this is not the final word in this case.”

Apple CEO Tim Cook said in a companywide e-mail that the case was about “values.”

“For us this lawsuit has always been about something much more important than patents or money. It’s about values,”

From TechT@lk Read More Here

Access Blocked

A US State Department report notes how the revolutions of the Middle East have been aided by the Internet, but points to another trend occurring simultaneously: governments fighting the power of the Internet.

The department’s annual human rights report says governments around the world are “spending more time, money and attention in efforts to curtail access to these new communications outlets.”

It says more than 40 governments are blocking their citizens’ access to the Internet through regulatory restrictions and technologies “designed to repress speech and infringe on the personal privacy of those who use these rapidly evolving technologies.”

The report released Friday singles out countries such as Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Vietnam and China as egregious examples.

 

Via AP

Pentagon-Hearts-Twitter

Pentagon looks to make friends on Facebook

The importance and relevance of an effective social media presence has been highlighted by the Pentagon’s decision to re-evaluate their online strategy.

Douglas Wilson, assistant secretary of defense for public affairs, has told Wired that while the military has ceased operations of the institution’s social media office, it views the platform as something that should be embraced by all Pentagon employees.

Former social networking experts hired by the Pentagon – Price Floyd and Sumit Agarwal – have left or been redeployed to another department respectively. Wilson commented that he views social media as an area that encompasses all aspects of the military.

He said: “It’s important for people in press operations, community and public outreach and communications and planning to be able to know how to use and access Facebook, Twitter and the other social media tools, rather than just have a single unit or single person do nothing but social media.”

Via E Word

Online games’ market set to explode

The gaming market is set to explode with Nintendo driving the other players. With its latest Nintendo 3DS, it is forcing the creators and publishers to up the ante. Four years ago, Nintendo did the same with the motion controlled Wii console. Sony followed with Playstation Move and Microsoft with Kinect. Going by the motion madness one would believe that it was these games that were exciting the players.

It is not so. The best games of 2010 are the ones you play the old fashioned way – on your controller in a chair. Reason is simple enough; the graphics, story lines and excitement offered by them are not matched by the Kinect games.

According to data compiled by NPD, a global research agency, and released by the Entertainment Software Association, about 20 million players have spent 17 billion hours on Xbox Live, which is more than 2 hours for every person on the planet.

Surprisingly, online gaming is somewhat equally divided between genders, at 58 percent male players and 42 percent female players. Some people are bold enough to predict that online gaming may just be the future.

The online gaming market is worth more than $15 billion, with a total of 40 million users who have registered PlayStation Network accounts. This is excluding XBox 360 and PC platform multiplayer games which would increase the numbers a lot.

Via International Business Times